Swine Health

Canada's reputation for producing high quality swine and pork products is directly attributable to producers' ongoing commitment to maintaining disease-free status in their swine herds.

Many diseases prevalent in livestock 20-30 years ago have all but been eradicated with the implementation of comprehensive biosecurity protocols, improved breeding and genetics and strict adherence to on-farm food safety programs. 

To prevent the spread of disease in Canadian swine herds, and to protect Canada's export markets, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency enforces adherence to strict controls and quarantine measure at borders to ensure no diseased animals enter Canada or are exported.

The Canadian Pork industry is committed to expanding the current knowledge and science on emerging diseases that can detrimentally affect the Canadian pig herds. Levy dollars collected from producers are applied to funding numerous Canadian research organizations whose work has a positive impact on the entire north American swine industry.

For more information on swine diseases can be found at the following links:

Reportable Diseases

The Canadian Food inspection Agency requires that: "Reportable diseases are outlined in the Health of Animals Act and Reportable Diseases Regulations and are usually of significant importance to human or animal health or to the Canadian economy. Animal owners, veterinarians and laboratories are required to immediately report the presence of an animal that is contaminated or suspected of being contaminated with one of these diseases to a CFIA district veterinarian. Control or eradication measures will be applied immediately."  For a complete list of reportable diseases refer to the CFIA list.

African Swine Fever

African swine fever (ASF) is a contagious viral disease that affects pigs of all ages. The disease can spread through direct or indirect contact and causes high mortality. The virus can persist for a long time in the environment and in a variety of swine products. Humans are not susceptible to the disease but can spread the virus through contaminated clothes or equipment and imported meat products. Feral pigs and European wild boar are equally susceptible to ASF.

For more information on the disease please watch the video https://youtu/be/eyQ4t1wHI2M

Click on the links below to access current information on ASF:

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) Virus 

PED does not affect humans or other animals and does not pose a food safety risk. Continuous improvements of biosecurity protocols on Saskatchewan hog farms and a commitment to enhanced transport biosecurity by swine transporters, have resulted in zero cases of PED at any Saskatchewan pork production operation.

Click here to link to PEDv Information and Resources

For more information:

Betty Althouse, DVM
Government of Saskatchewan Chief Veterinary Officer
Livestock Branch Ministry of Agriculture
Tel:  306-787-5547
Fax: 306-535-3476
Email:  betty.althouse@gov.sk.ca

Wendy Wilkins, DVM PhD
Disease Surveillance Veterinarian
Animal Health Unit, Room 202 Ministry of Agriculture
Tel:  306-798-0253 (wk) 
Fax: 306-798-0096 (fax)
Email:  wendy.wilkins@gov.sk.ca

Ravneet Kaur
Producer Services Manager, Sask Pork
2 – 502 45th Street West, Saskatoon, SK  S7L 6H2
Tel:  306-343-3502         Fax: 306-244-1712
Email:  rkaur@saskpork.com

Practical PEDV information for Producers

The National Pork Board has created the booklet, PEDV Resources, in which you’ll find practical steps created by working groups of industry experts designed to help you reduce the risk posed by PEDV to your pigs. Whether it’s enhancing your biosecurity protocols or rethinking the relationship with your veterinarian, there are plenty of good tips and reminders in this booklet!

Truck Biosecurity Videos:
Produced by Swine Health Professionals and Manitoba Pork Council.

Additional PEDv Resources:

For Additional Information: